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Postscript to Central Park 5 Case

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Members of the Central Park 5 outside theater just before premiere of documentary about their case. Photo by Michael Nagel for the NY Times.
Members of the Central Park 5 outside theater just before premiere of documentary about their case. Photo by Michael Nagel for the NY Times.

The Central Park 5 and the City of New York have reached a $40 million settlement in the 1989  high profile case of wrongful conviction and incarceration.  The deal fulfilled a campaign promise by Mayor Bill de Blasio to get justice for the men and their families.

Antron McCray, Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Yusuf Salaam and Raymond Santana were just teens when they were rounded up by NYC police and forced to confess to “wilding” that led to a vicious rape and assault of a white female jogger.

While Donald Trump called the deal “a disgrace” and asserted the settlement doesn’t mean innocence, many others felt the settlement brought some closure to the open wounds of injustice. Apparently The Donald missed the news that DNA testing exonerated the young people as well as the real rapist confessed to the crime.

The prosecution of this case was disgusting and racist. Justice delayed is justice denied.

Read my review on the documentary that came out last year. Click here.

 

Hole in the Head

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The amazing story of Vertus Hardiman and the black children of Lyles Station, IN was presented at the Missouri History Museum this evening. The event was sponsored by Call to Conscience (C2C) and began with a historical timeline of the horrendous medical experimentation conducted on us a people. The readings by members of C2C provided a powerful prelude to the documentary. It is proof positive that black folks are deserving of reparations.

MO Executions: Cruel, Unusual & Secret

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Join the conversion with me and Mark Thompson tonite at 7 pm CST on the topic of Missouri’s executions. Tune in on “Make It Plain” Sirius Radio 127. This article will be published today on BlackCommentator.com.

Execution-gurney

Hours before Missouri’s 75th execution, the relentless efforts of condemned killer Russell Bucklew and his attorneys paid off. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld a stay by the federal courts in one of the state’s most watched executions.

Bucklew was scheduled to be the first execution in the country since the recent botched performance in Oklahoma. Missouri is having the same problem as Oklahoma and other death penalty states—getting safe drugs for lethal injections and finding trained people to carry out the procedure. Read more